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Lynn Rosenthal, former White House advisor on violence against women and current vice president of strategic partnerships at The Hotline, opened the event with a call to action to the students in the room to engage more deeply with the issues of dating violence and sexual assault. Ray-Jones provided context for the event by describing The Hotline and loveisrespect’s services, drawing attention to the array of tools the organization offers to serve teens and young adults.

Following her remarks, she moderated a panel with nine students from across the District, giving them a chance to provide feedback about their experiences as student activists working on the issues of dating violence and sexual assault.

“It’s reminding survivors that you have a community behind you that wants to support you.”For Empowerment Week, Project SAFE collaborated with Active Minds and Planned Parenthood, promoting events that incorporated different perspectives on mental health and protection advocacy, according to Anderson.

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Money Keys to car, house, work Extra clothes Medicine Important papers for you and your children Birth certificates Social security cards School and medical records Bankbooks, credit cards Driver’s license Car registration Welfare identification Passports, green cards, work permits Lease/rental agreement Mortgage payment book, unpaid bills Insurance papers PPO, divorce papers, custody orders Address book Pictures, jewelry, things that mean a lot to you Items for your children (toys, blankets, etc.) WARNING: Abusers try to control their victim’s lives. Teenagers often experience violence in dating relationships.

When abusers feel a loss of control – like when victims try to leave them – the abuse often gets worse. Statistics show that one in three teenagers has experienced violence in a dating relationship.

The lone male student on the panel also underscored the need to further engage men on these issues.

Next, the rest of the attendees broke out into tabletop discussions to further explore the topics raised by the student panel.

Students often have difficulty recognizing verbal and emotional abuse, or do not have enough experience in relationships to know that the abusive behavior is not normal or healthy.